This Rotating Head of Franz Kafka is Absolutely a Head-turner

I have to admit that this rotating head of Franz Kafka in Prague is weirdly wonderful. It’s my very first time to see such a public art installation this amazing! I was at loss for words the moment I saw this. Boy, I was mesmerized that I didn’t even take photos right away. Watching the rotating head and figuring out how it works was dizzying. I was not even planning to see or look for this but I stumbled on it while exiting a mall in Prague.

This Rotating Head of Franz Kafka is Absolutely a Head-turner
Statue of Franz Kafka in Prague

This rotating bust of Kafka is aptly entitled, “Metamorphosis.” You can also call it “The Head of Kafka” or “The Head Statue of Kafka.”

This Rotating Head of Franz Kafka is Absolutely a Head-turner
The sculpture is a work of David Cerny.

As you can see, this is unlike other public art you’ll see anywhere in Prague or in the world.

This Rotating Head of Franz Kafka is Absolutely a Head-turner
This Rotating Head of Franz Kafka is Absolutely a Head-turner

The bust has 42 rotating tiers that metamorphose into objects, designs, patterns – or whatever you see. It is said that its constant changes depict the tormenting personality of the Czech writer who lived his whole life with incessant self-doubt.

Bust of FranzKafka
Public art in Prague

The kinetic sculpture is shiny reflective and is absolutely a head-turner (figuratively and literally)!

Where is it?

You can find it in the busy Quadrio business district in Prague. It’s right above the metro station called Národní třída.

Another Statue of Kafka

If you want to trace Kafka in Prague, you might also be interested in seeing another weirdly wonderful sculpture of him. To describe it simply, this statue shows a tiny, young man sitting on the shoulders of a big, tall guy. If you’ve read Kafka’s short story, “Description of a Struggle,” then, this statue comes to mind.

Statue of Kafka Prague

You can find this public art on Dusni Street, just outside the historic Jewish Cemetery. Kafka used to live on this street where he wrote many of his stories.

Someone told me that if you touch this sculpture, you’ll be back in Prague one day. And so I did! Let’s see if that happens.

Hotel / Hostel in Prague

I stayed at Cosmopole Hostel in a busy area where public transport to and from the train station is just a few steps from the door. The Old Town is around 20 minutes walk, passing by some of the city’s unique architecture. The hostel is surrounded by shops and cafes that are even late at night. The rooms are quite small, but with only four people in it, you can still move around comfortably. Be aware that Prague is pretty expensive, so finding cheap accommodation can be a challenge. It’s also super touristy here, the earlier you book, the better you have the chance to get a bed space.

These hostels are in the center of the Old Town: SafeStay Prague and Hostel Homer. If you can afford, the Corinthia Hotel Prague is for you. You can book all of these hotel/hotels in Prague via BookingTripAdvisorHostelWorld, and Expedia.

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